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The Stonehenge Adventure (Part 3) – Stonehenge and Woodhenge

By Adventures, Friends & Family, Happiness & Joy, PaganismNo Comments

This is the third and final part of my adventure to see Stonehenge and other ancient sites nearby with my good friend Simon. In part 1 I blogged about Avebury Stone Circles. In part 2 I blogged about Glastonbury, The Chalice Well and the city of Wells. In this part I will blog about Stonehenge and Woodhenge.

Stonehenge is perhaps the most well known and one of the oldest stone circles in the world. It is not only a World Heritage Site but also 1 of the 7 Wonders of the World.

Stonehenge is managed by English Heritage and the on-site Visitor Centre includes an exhibition, reconstructed neolithic houses, audio guide handsets, a cafe and gift shop.

Stonehenge its self is a short bus ride away from the visitor centre and busses are provided as part of the admission price (as is access to the exhibition, access to neolithic houses and use of audio guides). The stones themselves are roped off, not allowing the thousands of visitors per day to get too close. Here are some photos:

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An illustration of how they think ancient man moved the Stonehenge stones from Wales to England.

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A hut ancient man lived in whilst building Stonehenge (1).

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A hut ancient man lived in whilst building Stonehenge (2).

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Examples of pottery that ancient people would have had.

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Examples of tools that ancient people would have had.

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Stonehenge (1).

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Obligatory Stonehenge Selfie.

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Stonehenge (2).

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Stonehenge (3).

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Stonehenge (4).

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Stonehenge (5).

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Stonehenge (6).

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Stonehenge (7).

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Stonehenge (8).

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A crow opening its beak and cawing to try and get food from tourists.

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Stonehenge Merchandise: Stonehenge as it would have looked in a tin.

Essential Info

  • Stonehenge is the remains of an ancient stone circle. The site includes a Visitor Centre which includes: exhibition, reconstructed neolithic houses, audio guide handsets, a cafe, toilets and gift shop.
  • Highly Recommended.
  • Opening Times: For opening times click here.
  • Admission Price: £18.20 (with gift aid) and £16.50 (without gift aid).
  • Parking: Free on-site.

Woodhenge is a series of concrete posts in the ground where the poles of wood that made up Woodhenge would have been. Simon and I both felt that the site, managed by English Heritage, was a missed opportunity to recreate Woodhenge, restoring it to its forma glory. Here are some photos of Woodhenge:

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Concrete stones representing where the poles of Woodhenge would have been.

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A burial of a baby at the centre of Woodhenge. Nothing is known about the baby or reason for burial.


Essential Info

  • Woodhenge is a series of concrete posts in the ground where the poles of wood that made up Woodhenge would have been.
  • Recommended.
  • Opening Times: Any reasonable time during daylight hours.
  • Admission Price: Free.
  • Parking: Plenty of free parking on the street.

Write soon,

Antony



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A Visit to Southport Botanic Gardens (Churchtown)

By Adventures, Friends & Family, Happiness & Joy, Inspiration, Life, NatureNo Comments

Yesterday my friend Simon and I visited Southport Botanic Gardens in Churchtown, Southport. It was perfect weather and we had a great time exploring a park bursting with a variety of trees and shrubs from across the world.

Southport Botanic Gardens features include a bowling green, a Cafe, an Aviary, a Victorian Fernery, a Victorian Garden, a children’s play park suitable for all ages and a lake. Here are some photos from our visit (click on any image for full-size):

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Southport Botanic Gardens (Churchtown) Sign.

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Southport Botanic Gardens entrance.

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A short stone tunnel.

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The Cafe & Aviary in the centre of the Botanic Gardens.

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The Aviary houses a variety of birds.

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Victorian Fernery notice board sign.

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Inside the Victorian Fernery is this beautiful fountain.

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Inside the Victorian Fernery is this small Wishing Well.

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Me inside the Victorian Fernery.

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The Victorian Garden (1).

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The Victorian Garden (2).

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The Victorian Garden (3).

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The lake is bigger than a pond, but not really big enough to justify the term lake.

Essential Info:

  • Admission Fee: Free.
  • Opening Times vary so check Visit Southport’s website.
  • Postcode for SatNavs or Google Maps is: PR9 7NB.
  • Free parking is available on the street outside of the Botanic Gardens.
  • Highly Recommended is the reasonably priced Cafe.
  • In the same building as the Cafe is a gift shop. It sells seeds for the birds in The Aviary There is also a gift shop, which sells seeds for birds at The The Aviary, toys & sweets and other seemingly random gifts.
  • Has Toilet facilities.

There were many trees that Simon and I admired, but weren’t able to identify. The only thing that could have been improved was more information about the trees and shrubs. A fun way this could be done is by means of a tree hunt. It would be great if visitors could pick up a leaflet from the Cafe, which directed visitors to trees and shrubs in the Botanic Garden. The leaflet could help visitors identify what species of tree or shrub that they have found and a give a bit of additional information.

Afterwards Simon and I headed home, stopping along the way for tea.

Blog soon,

Antony



I aim for posts on this blog to be informative, educational and entertaining. If you have found this post useful or enjoyable, please consider making a contribution by Paypal:


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